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Zuckerberg told Congress essentially nothing, lawyers will prepare him for future questions

Staff Writer |
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told Congress on Monday that the social media network should have done more to prevent itself and its members’ data being misused.


This precedes two days of Congressional hearings where Zuckerberg is set to answer questions about Facebook user data being improperly appropriated by a political consultancy and the role the network played in the U.S. 2016 election.

“We didn’t take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake,” he said in remarks released by the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee on Monday.

“It was my mistake, and I’m sorry. I started Facebook, I run it, and I’m responsible for what happens here.”

Zuckerberg was meeting with lawmakers on Capitol Hill on Monday ahead of his scheduled appearance before two Congressional committees on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Zuckerberg did not respond to questions as he entered and left a meeting with Senator Bill Nelson, the top Democrat on the Senate Commerce Committee.

He is expected to meet Senator John Thune, the Commerce Committee’s Republican chairman, later in the day, among others.

Zuckerberg also said that Facebook’s major investments in security “will significantly impact our profitability going forward.”

Zuckerberg’s testimony said the company was “too slow to spot and respond to Russian interference, and we’re working hard to get better.”

He vowed to make improvements, adding it would take time, but said he was “committed to getting it right.”

A Facebook official confirmed, Reuters reports, that the company had hired a team from the law firm WilmerHale and outside consultants to help prepare Zuckerberg for his testimony and how lawmakers may question him.


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