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Kentucky AG announces settlement with Brothers Market following Colonial Pipeline shutdown

Christian Fernsby |
Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced a settlement with a Kentucky fuel retailer and convenience store, Brothers Market.

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The settlement resolves allegations of unfair business practices by the business related to excessive fuel prices following the Colonial Pipeline shutdown.

“Thanks to tips from concerned Kentuckians, we investigated increased fuel prices at Brothers Market and reached a settlement with the business for excessively increasing fuel costs to take advantage of consumers following the Colonial Pipeline shutdown,” said Attorney General Cameron.

Following a cyberattack on the Colonial Pipeline, which created a disruption in the delivery of gasoline, Attorney General Cameron’s Office of Consumer Protection received eleven complaints of suspected price gouging of gasoline at Brothers Market in Girdler, Kentucky.

While investigating these complaints against Brothers Market, the Knox County retailer admitted to increasing their gasoline prices to capitalize on increased buying spurred by the Colonial Pipeline shutdown.

During their investigation, the Office of Consumer Protection discovered that the retailer had increased the price of regular gasoline by 9.3 percent to 19.4 percent and sold 6,860.04 gallons of regular gasoline, accumulating $5,666.40 in additional profit as a result of the inflated prices.

Special Attorney Rebecca Price worked with Brothers Market’s counsel and reached an agreement to settle allegations of unfair business practices in violation of the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act.

Under the agreement, Brothers Market agreed to:

• Pay $5,666.40 in profit disgorgement;

• Comply with the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act by not selling or offering to sell fuel at its station or any other station owned or operated by Brothers Market in Kentucky for unconscionable prices.

If the retailer violates the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act again, the store will be liable for the waived civil penalties, totaling $41,160.24, and will face additional enforcement action by the Attorney General’s office.


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