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90-degree heat stifles Anchorage for first time in its history

Christian Fernsby |
The temperature in Anchorage, Alaska, soared to 90 degrees Fahrenheit on Thursday, shattering the city's all-time record-high temperature by 5 degrees.

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The previous record of 85 degrees Fahrenheit was set in 1969. It also shattered the daily record of 77 degrees for the Fouth of July, which had stood since 1999. Records in Anchorage date back to 1952.

Several other places in Alaska set all-time or daily records on Thursday.

While it was well above normal in Anchorage, the 90-degree temperature is not a first for the state of Alaska.

According to records kept by the National Weather Service (NWS), Alaska is no stranger to the 90s. In fact, way back on July 28, 1919, Fairbanks made a run at 100 when the mercury topped out at 99. Fairbanks has experienced 90-degree heat on several other occasions, most recently on Aug. 5, 1994, when it recorded a 93-degree temperature.

Other spots in Alaska have hit the 90s too, including McGrath, which had a 94-degree temperature as recently as June 17, 2013. Alaska has seen triple-digit heat at least once since record keeping began: In 1915, Fort Yukon, which is situated in central eastern Alaska, recorded a temperature of 100 degrees.


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