POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

Compensation still available to 9-11 responders and survivors

Staff Writer |
Each year, as the anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks approaches, the country is reminded of the unprecedented losses suffered.

Article continues below






The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund (VCF) acknowledges the important milestones reached in providing support to victims and families and is especially aware of the lives that continue to be affected.

The anniversary is a time for the VCF to reaffirm its commitment to the important work that still lies ahead, and to maintain strong and steady progress as the VCF seeks to award compensation to those who continue to suffer.

The VCF releases its statistics report and informs the community on its outreach efforts.

The VCF’s statistics report details the enormous strides the VCF has made since its reopening in 2011 and its reauthorization in 2015.

As of Aug. 31, the VCF has rendered over 14,000 compensation determinations, including initial awards on new claims, and revised awards on claims with amendments or appeals.

These determinations total over $3 billion awarded to VCF claimants, which exceeds the original $2.775 billion authorized by Congress when the VCF reopened in 2011.

In all, the VCF has compensated claims from more than 11,500 responders to the attacks in New York City, at the Pentagon, and at the Shanksville site, as well as more than 2,400 others who lived, worked, or traveled through areas of lower Manhattan and suffered physical health conditions as a result of their exposure to debris and toxins generated by the attacks and their aftermath.

The VCF is also increasing its efforts to identify those who may be eligible for compensation because they suffer physical health effects as a result of their exposure but are not aware of the VCF, and is working with partners in the community to extend its reach.

The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund was created to provide compensation for any individual (or a personal representative of a deceased individual) who suffered physical harm or was killed as a result of the terrorist-related aircraft crashes of September 11, 2001 or the debris removal efforts that took place in the immediate aftermath of those crashes.

The original VCF operated from 2001 to 2004. On Jan. 2, 2011, President Obama signed into law the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 (Zadroga Act). Title II of the Zadroga Act reactivated the Sept. 11th Victim Compensation Fund.

The reactivated VCF opened in October 2011 and was authorized to operate for a period of five years, ending in October 2016. On Dec. 18, 2015, President Obama signed into law a bill reauthorizing the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010.

This included the reauthorization of the VCF. The new law extends the VCF for five years, allowing individuals to submit their claims until Dec. 18, 2020.

The law also includes some important changes to the VCF’s policies and procedures for evaluating claims and calculating each claimant’s loss.


What to read next

Responders continue efforts to remove vessel grounded off Honolulu
Swiss lawyers to help Qataris sue over Gulf blockade
Barge fire extinguished in Gulf of Mexico