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Luxury buyers in Germany head to internet

Staff writer |
The internet is now the go-to destination for consumers in Germany who want to keep abreast of luxury and lifestyle trends, according to Tomorrow Focus Media.

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October 2014 polling by the company found that the web had overtaken all other sources of trend and product information for such consumers, including more traditional favorites such as TV, friends and family.

Magazines and journals ranked second; nearly 55% of respondents said they got information about luxury trends and products from such publications, while almost half (49.2%) researched luxury items in local stores.

Social networks were another platform for engaging with luxury brands, though barely one-quarter of respondents (26.2%) followed any brands on social sites. Facebook claimed the lion’s share of this interest, as nearly 88% of those who did follow brands said they used it to keep track of luxury brand developments.

Fewer than 25% turned to Twitter, Instagram or Pinterest to follow a brand.

There was a strong correlation between online shopping and the purchase of luxury goods, too. More than 90% of respondents said they bought at retailers such as Amazon.com and Zalando, and 61.8% were customers of the online stores of luxury goods manufacturers, brands or designers themselves.

Around two-thirds of the luxury goods buyers polled by Tomorrow Focus Media used PayPal for their internet transactions, while almost as many (61.6%) preferred the invoice option—long an established method of paying for goods remotely among consumers in Germany.

Credit cards were gaining fans, though; more than half (54.7%) of respondents bought luxury goods online this way. Mobile payments were still a rarity, with just 5.3% of respondents purchasing with their mobile phone or a tablet.


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