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Middle East and North Africa best for working women

Staff writer |
The participation of women in the working force declined in the world between 1990 and 2013, but increased in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

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The Middle East and North Africa are the regions where the lowest wage differential between men and women with 14%, well below the global average of 24%.

In MENA the wage differential between men and us 14%, global average is 24%.
The data is part of a report released by the United Nations (UN Women), which also shows improvement in other regions of the world. Globally, it went from 52% to 50%. In Latin America and the Caribbean, women's participation increased considerably.

In the Middle East and North Africa, women went from an economic participation of 20% in 1990 to 22% in 2013. Despite the women's small progress, men still have a much higher percentage as working force agents in the region: 75%. This number stood, 25 years ago, at 76%.

In Latin America and the Caribbean the improvement was greater than in MENA. Women were 40% of the working force and improved to 54%, according to data from the United Nations.

There was a decline in the women's presence in the economies of South, Central and East Asia, Central and East Europe and the Pacific, but an increase in the Middle East and North Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, developed countries and sub-Saharan Africa. The greatest improvement came from Latin American countries.

Among the declining percentages, the lowest of them came from East Asia and the Pacific, where women had a participation of 69% and dropped to 62%.

In Latin America and the Caribbean, the wage differential between genders stands at 19%, the second lowest. The highest one happens in South Asia.

In the survey, the United Nations suggests a series of actions to be taken for the transformation of the world economy with consideration to women's rights. The first one is to create more and better jobs to women. "The participation of women in the working force stagnated all around the world", says the report. The UN also suggests the reduction of occupational segregation and wage differential between genders, since women occupy only 33% of the management positions against 63% of the administrative and supports posts.


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