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Online labor demand decreased 226,700 in June

Staff Writer |
Online advertised vacancies decreased 226,700 to 4,657,500 in June, according to The Conference Board Help Wanted OnLine (HWOL) Data Series.

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The May Supply/Demand rate stands at 1.52 unemployed for each advertised vacancy with a total of 2.6 million more unemployed workers than the number of advertised vacancies. The number of unemployed was around 7.4 million in May.

“The losses in the first quarter of 2016 have been followed with even larger losses in the second quarter,” said Gad Levanon, Chief Economist, North America, at The Conference Board. “The 2016 slowdown in demand has been widespread, affecting virtually all States and MSAs.”

In June, the Professional category saw losses in all major occupational categories with the largest losses in Management (−24.1), Business/Finance (−21.3), and Computer/Math (−34.8).

The Services/Production category saw large losses in Sales (−26.3), Office/Admin (−33.1), and Installation/Repair (−13.4); other categories showed only small gains and losses.

In June, online labor demand was up in 2 States, and down in 48. All four regions experienced decreases.

The Midwest experienced a decrease of 53,300 in June (Table A). Illinois declined 13,700 to 174,800. Ohio declined 10,300 to 164,800. Wisconsin decreased 6,300 to 97,000. Michigan decreased 6,000 to 144,600 and Minnesota fell 4,300 to 128,600. Missouri decreased 3,000 to 85,400.

Among the smaller States in the region, Indiana decreased 5,600 to 76,700, and Kansas decreased 1,500 to 39,100. Iowa declined 3,200 to 58,100, Nebraska fell 700 to 33,700, and North Dakota decreased 400 to 15,400.

The Northeast declined 42,700 in June. Pennsylvania decreased 14,500 to 188,100, the largest change in the region. New York fell 12,200 to 266,100 and Massachusetts decreased 9,900 to 139,100.

New Jersey declined 3,300 to 145,200. In the smaller States, Connecticut lost 1,700 to 57,200. Maine decreased 500 to 19,600 and New Hampshire fell 200 to 23,500. Rhode Island fell 500 to 14,700 and Vermont grew 300 to 10,500.

The West decreased 64,300 in June. California decreased 45,900 to 537,000. Colorado decreased 3,400 to 114,800 and Arizona fell 5,500 to 95,700. Washington increased 3,200 to 158,100.

Among the smaller States in theWest, Oregon decreased 2,000 to 75,100 and Utah declined 2,200 to 57,600. Nevada decreased 1,800 to 44,500. Idaho decreased 100 to 23,800, and New Mexico decreased 300 to 25,600. Montana decreased 1,200 to 19,100 and Wyoming decreased 300 to 7,500.

The South decreased 68,700. Among the larger States in the region, Texas fell 16,800, to 323,400. Florida decreased 13,400 to 244,000 and Georgia decreased 6,300 to 150,600. North Carolina decreased 5,500 to 125,100. Maryland fell 5,600 to 96,900.

Virginia decreased 4,400 to 150,000. Among the smaller States, Alabama decreased 1,800 to 44,900. Tennessee decreased 4,000 to 77,800 and Kentucky declined 3,000 to 45,700. South Carolina fell 2,300 to 57,900 and Oklahoma decreased 1,400 to 37,800. Louisiana fell 1,200 to 43,200 and Delaware decreased 600 to 15,300.

The data are for May 2016, the latest month for which State unemployment figures are available.

There were 7 States in which the number of advertised vacancies exceeded the number of unemployed: South Dakota (0.63), Colorado (0.82), New Hampshire (0.85), North Dakota (0.85), Minnesota (0.86), Nebraska (0.89), and Utah (0.96).

The States with the highest Supply/Demand rates were Louisiana (3.06), Alabama (2.83), Mississippi (2.75), and West Virginia (2.59), which had more than two unemployed workers for every job opening.


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