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Macquarie Capital to develop high-speed internet in Kentucky

Staff writer |
A new public-private partnership will develop a fiber backbone infrastructure to bring high-speed internet connectivity to every corner of Kentucky with the critical first components scheduled to be operational in less than two years.

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Governor Steve Beshear and U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers announced the partnership with Macquarie Capital.

"We are on an aggressive timeline and believe that the Macquarie team’s technical capabilities and history of innovative solutions are the best fit for this important project," said Gov. Beshear.

"Kentucky’s Internet speed and accessibility have lagged behind the rest of the nation far too long. This partnership puts us on the path to propel the Commonwealth forward in education, economic development, health care, public safety and much more."

This infrastructure project is unlike any other seen in Kentucky in the last 50 years. Broadband, now considered an essential utility service, will improve Kentucky’s dismal connectivity and slow speeds to some of the fastest and highest capacity service in the U.S. – all with the potential to lower consumer costs and improve coverage as well.

Just as important, this project will be paid for up front by leveraging private capital at no additional cost to Kentucky taxpayers.

The first stage of the project is to build the main broadband fiber lines across the state. These major fiber lines are called the "middle mile." The "open access" network will allow the private sector to use the fiber to deliver services into communities.

Once complete, other Internet service provider companies, cities, partnerships, or other groups may then tap into those "middle mile" lines to complete the "last mile",, the lines that run to individual homes or businesses.

Where already in place, the project will take advantage of existing infrastructure, thus partnering with local telecommunications companies, municipalities and major carriers to deliver the network more quickly and reduce construction costs.

Improved cell phone coverage is anticipated as part of the initiative. Cell phone companies may choose to use the state’s "middle-mile" fiber network to add capacity and broaden coverage areas throughout the Commonwealth that have traditionally had poor cell phone reception.

When completed, the more than 3,000 miles of fiber will be in place across the state. This "middle-mile" fiber infrastructure is key to reaching much of Kentucky’s large rural population.

Fiber will be available in all 120 counties, and the underserved eastern Kentucky region will be the first priority area for the project. The Center for Rural Development in Somerset will partner with the Commonwealth, focusing on communities east of Interstate 75. The Center will also host education workshops to help communities learn how to connect to the new network.


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