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New step for Hawaiki, 14,000 km transpacific cable system

Staff Writer |
Following a supply contract in March and a survey of landing sites from May to July 2016, Hawaiki Submarine Cable and TE SubCom, a TE Connectivity company, launched a marine route survey.

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This is a significant stage in the deployment of Hawaiki, the 14,000 km transpacific cable system scheduled for completion in mid-2018.

Hawaiki will link Australia and New Zealand to the mainland United States, as well as Hawaii, with options to expand to several South Pacific islands.

The 14,000 km cable system will deliver more than 30 Tbps of capacity via TE SubCom’s C100U+ Submarine Line Terminating Equipment (SLTE) and will allow for optional connectivity to islands along the route, utilizing TE SubCom’s industry leading optical add/drop multiplexing (OADM) nodes.

Hawaiki will be the highest cross-sectional capacity link between the U.S. and Australia and New Zealand.

As a carrier-neutral cable system, Hawaiki will usher in a new era of international connectivity benefitting businesses and consumers across the Pacific region.

The system was co-developed by New Zealand-based entrepreneurs Sir Eion Edgar, Malcolm Dick and Remi Galasso.

“Each stage of this groundbreaking project is important, but after very carefully planning our transpacific route and conducting an extensive survey of each landing site, we are extremely pleased to launch the marine route survey, which will give us data necessary to safely and properly deploy the system in the coming months,” said Remi Galasso, chief executive officer of Hawaiki.

“The team is doing a great job; we are on time and on budget. We are confident that with our trusted supplier, TE SubCom, our cable will be delivered as planned in mid-2018, less than two years from now.

“Hawaiki is not only bringing competition and diversity to the market, but it’s also offering a future-proof solution to its customers in the most cost-effective fashion.”


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