POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

Vismara's confusion

Martha Taylor-Brown |
"You have to systematically create confusion, it sets creativity free. Everything that is contradictory creates life" Salvador Dali

Article continues below





Can we separate the art from art and what is art in general? Salvador Dali once said: "Those who do not want to imitate anything, produce nothing."

Known painting "Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer" by Gustav Klimt, Austrian symbolist, was sold for 135,000,000 dollars few years ago. This record sale was possible by a court order of the Austrian government to return the painting to the artist's heir. Today, "Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer" is in the art circles known as the painting of all time.

The most priceless photography ever sold was that by Andreas Gursky, a German photographer. His "99 Cent II Diptych" is the first photograph sold for more than three million dollars. To be specific, it was sold for 3,340,456 dollars at a Sotheby's auction in London in February 2007. The thing that makes the story even better is that Gursky sold the photography three times. The first print was sold in May 2006 for 2.25 million dollars and another for 2.48 million dollars just six months later. What a master!

An interesting fact is that record wining photography was sold not at a photography auction but on a sale of contemporary art. "The art is in the observer's eye", said someone, but our theme are frames, anyway. Frames today exist in many forms and in many price ranges. The art of frames exist since the second century B.C. The first frames were carved out of wood and then covered in Gesso and Gold Leaf. Frames mass-production started in 19th century when handcrafted frames began to vanish.

During the centuries, each country started its own, so called frames evolution and classification. That's how we recognize today renaissance frames, Mannerist, the polished wooden cabinetmaker's frame, Baroque, Palladian and Rococo, the Roman "Salvator Rosa", Neoclassical frames, and the 19th and 20th century academic or artists' frames.

Now, the ultimate question is do you ever considered to frame your TV, DVD and CD collection? What the idea, now you think. Very good idea, we answer.

The Italian company Vismara Design gives completely different dimension to word "frame" by offering really artistic solutions for your TVs, game consoles, speaker systems, CDs and DVDs collections. Its frames are absolutely gorgeous and available in a variety of themes, from a Baroque style to modern sleek and coloured in silver or gold. Each frame can be decorated with a mirror inside. Catch your image in Vismara's frame or replace your old boring CD storage with a gorgeous Baroque one. The choice is completely yours.