POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES (11.19.2021, 4:50pm CEST, WHO):   India 11,106    Brazil 11,977    United Kingdom 46,858    Russia 37,156    Turkey 22,234    France 19,840    Argentina 1,553    Germany 52,970    Spain 3,932    Columbia 2,257    Italy 10,645    Mexico 3,836    Ukraine 20,050    Poland 23,242    Philippines 1,297    Malaysia 6,380    Netherlands 23,680    Peru 1,370    Thailand 6,855    Czechia 13,374    Canada 2,448    Romania 3,076    Chile 2,611    Serbia 3,219    Sweden 1,210    Portugal 2,398    Vietnam 10,223    Kazakhstan 1,272    Austria 14,212    Hungary 11,289    Greece 7,276    Georgia 4,278    Bulgaria 2,785    Belarus 1,844    Slovakia 7,418    Azerbaijan 2,124    Croatia 7,270    Bolivia 1,119    Ireland 4,646    Lithuania 1,847    Denmark 4,013    South Korea 3,034    Slovenia 3,662    Latvia 1,221    Laos 1,401    China 31    New Zealand 200    Australia 1,302   

Common skin bacteria P. acnes offers disease protection

Staff Writer |
Our most common skin bacteria may help shield us from some skin diseases, a new study suggests.

Article continues below






Swedish researchers report that Propionibacterium acnes secretes a protein called RoxP that protects against bacteria that are believed to contribute to several skin disorders.

Specifically, RoxP protects against skin cell damage called oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen bacteria. UV radiation from the sun is a common cause of oxidative stress on the skin.

Oxidative stress is believed to contribute to several skin diseases, including eczema, psoriasis and skin cancer.

The protective effect of RoxP is as strong as antioxidants such as vitamins C and E, according to the study published recently in the journal Scientific Reports.

"This protein is important for the bacterium's very survival on our skin. The bacterium improves its living environment by secreting RoxP, but in doing so it also benefits us," study author Rolf Lood said in a news release from Lund University in Sweden. He is a postdoctoral researcher in Lund's Department of Clinical Sciences.

The name Propionibacterium acnes comes from the fact that it was first discovered on a patient with acne. "But whether it causes acne is uncertain - it may have been present merely because it is so common," Lood said.

Propionibacterium acnes is found on people with and without skin diseases. But people have different amounts of the bacterium on their skin, which can produce varying amounts of RoxP, Lood noted.