POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES IN LAST 24 HOURS (9.21.2021, 5:41pam CEST, WHO):   India 26,115    Brazil 9,458    United Kingdom 35,702    Russia 19,179    Turkey 27,688    Iran 17,397    Columbia 1,813    Italy 2,405    Indonesia 3,263    Germany 4,664    Mexico 4,983    South Africa 1,504    Philippines 18,937    Ukraine 5,159    Malaysia 14,345    Netherlands 1,370    Iraq 3,192    Japan 2,405    Bangladesh 1,562    Thailand 10,919    Pakistan 2,167    Romania 6,789    Morocco 2,246    Serbia 6,424    Jordan 1,075    Cuba 8,544    Nepal 1,036    Austria 1,162    Vietnam 8,681    Greece 2,124    Georgia 2,470    Belarus 1,941    Costa Rica 1,627    Bulgaria 2,360    Myanmar 1,687    Palestine 3,909    Croatia 1,037    Ireland 1,150    Libya 1,081    Lithuania 1,157    South Korea 1,729    Mongolia 2,543    Botswana 1,536    El Salvador 2,323    China 83    Singapore 0    New Zealand 15    Australia 1,515   

FDA bans use of opioid-containing cough meds by kids

Staff Writer |
Trying to put a dent in the ongoing opioid addiction crisis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration slapped strict new restrictions on the use of opioid-containing cold and cough products by kids.

Article continues below




These prescription medicines involve any that include codeine or oxycodone, the FDA said.

"After safety labeling changes are made, these products will no longer be indicated for use to treat cough in any pediatric population and will be labeled for use only in adults aged 18 years and older," the FDA said in a news release.

The newly updated Boxed Warning on these medicines will also warn adult users "about the risks of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose and death, and slowed or difficult breathing that can result from exposure to codeine or hydrocodone," the agency added.

"Given the epidemic of opioid addiction, we're concerned about unnecessary exposure to opioids, especially in young children. We know that any exposure to opioid drugs can lead to future addiction.

It's become clear that the use of prescription, opioid-containing medicines to treat cough and cold in children comes with serious risks that don't justify their use in this vulnerable population," FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in the news release.

"It's critical that we protect children from unnecessary exposure to prescription cough medicines containing codeine or hydrocodone," he added. "At the same time we're taking steps to help reassure parents that treating the common cough and cold is possible without using opioid-containing products."

The move comes after a 2017 decision by the FDA to add its strongest warning—a "contraindication"—to labeling for prescription products containing codeine.

That labeling restricted use to children aged 12 and over "due to a specific risk of ultra-rapid metabolism in certain patients," the FDA explained.

The new rules announced Thursday were "based on an extensive review of available data and expert advice," the agency said.


What to read next

Every illness sounds differently - cough
Medicaid patients continue high prescription opioid use after overdose
Codeine, tramadol can cause life-threatening breathing problems in kids