POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES (11.19.2021, 4:50pm CEST, WHO):   India 11,106    Brazil 11,977    United Kingdom 46,858    Russia 37,156    Turkey 22,234    France 19,840    Argentina 1,553    Germany 52,970    Spain 3,932    Columbia 2,257    Italy 10,645    Mexico 3,836    Ukraine 20,050    Poland 23,242    Philippines 1,297    Malaysia 6,380    Netherlands 23,680    Peru 1,370    Thailand 6,855    Czechia 13,374    Canada 2,448    Romania 3,076    Chile 2,611    Serbia 3,219    Sweden 1,210    Portugal 2,398    Vietnam 10,223    Kazakhstan 1,272    Austria 14,212    Hungary 11,289    Greece 7,276    Georgia 4,278    Bulgaria 2,785    Belarus 1,844    Slovakia 7,418    Azerbaijan 2,124    Croatia 7,270    Bolivia 1,119    Ireland 4,646    Lithuania 1,847    Denmark 4,013    South Korea 3,034    Slovenia 3,662    Latvia 1,221    Laos 1,401    China 31    New Zealand 200    Australia 1,302   

FDA warns ovarian cancer tests not reliable

Staff Writer |
Screening tests for ovarian cancer are not reliable and should not be used, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Article continues below






"Despite extensive research and published studies, there are currently no screening tests for ovarian cancer that are sensitive enough to reliably screen for ovarian cancer without a high number of inaccurate results," the agency said in its warning.

"However, over the years, numerous companies have marketed tests that claim to screen for and detect ovarian cancer," the FDA added.

But these tests may lead to delays in effective preventive treatments for high-risk women who have no symptoms, or result in unnecessary medical tests and/or surgery for those who do not have the disease, the agency noted.

According to the American Cancer Society, the most common screening test is called the CA-125 blood test. In many women with ovarian cancer, levels of this protein are high. But the problem with using it is that common conditions other than cancer can also cause high levels of CA-125, the cancer society says.

That's why women should not rely on ovarian cancer screening tests to make health or treatment decisions, the FDA said in its warning. This is especially important for women who have a family history of ovarian cancer or the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutations, which raise the risk of both breast and ovarian cancer, the agency added.

Doctors should not recommend or use ovarian cancer screening tests in the general population, and they need to understand they are not a substitute for preventive measures that may reduce the chances of disease in high-risk patients, the FDA said.

The warning was issued after a review of available evidence from clinical trials and the recommendations of health care groups and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) said Thursday that it supports the FDA warning.

"Obstetrician-gynecologists should be aware that tests currently marketed to screen women for ovarian cancer are not based on data," Dr. Thomas Gellhaus, ACOG president, said in a statement. "ACOG is in agreement with the FDA and recommends against using these offered tests to screen for ovarian cancer," he added.


What to read next

Largest study of ovarian cancer uncovers new biology
Breast cancer screenings still best for early detection
Additional pancreatic cancer treatments don't boost survival