POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES IN LAST 24 HOURS (6.24.2021, 10:46am CEST, WHO):   U.S. 12,874    India 50,848    Brazil 87,822    Turkey 6,143    Russia 17,594    The United Kingdom 11,481    Argentina 21,387    Columbia 28,616    Spain 1,799    Germany 1,016    Iran 11,059    Mexico 4,233    Peru 2,995    Indonesia 15,308    South Africa 11,093    Chile 2,746    Philippines 4,353    Iraq 6,297    Bangladesh 5,727    Portugal 1,020    Japan 1,790    Malaysia 5,244    Nepal 1,511    United Arab Emirates 1,988    Saudi Arabia 1,253    Ecuador 1,931    Bolivia 1,667    Paraguay 1,746    Panama 1,208    Tunisia 3,638    Uruguay 2,079    Costa Rica 1,525    Kuwait 1,870    Venezuela 1,334    Oman 2,047    Sri Lanka 2,196    Thailand 3,174    Cuba 2,055    Zambia 3,028    Afghanistan 1,575    Mongolia 2,213    Rwanda 1,483    Réunion 1,061    China 122    Singapore 22    New Zealand 0    Australia 12    South Korea 610   

Global life expectancy on rise, major inequalities persist

Staff writer |
Dramatic gains in life expectancy have been made globally since 2000, but major inequalities persist within and among countries, according to this year’s “World Health Statistics: Monitoring Health for the SDGs”.

Article continues below






Life expectancy increased by 5 years between 2000 and 2015, the fastest increase since the 1960s. Those gains reverse declines during the 1990s, when life expectancy fell in Africa because of the AIDS epidemic and in Eastern Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

The increase was greatest in the African Region of WHO where life expectancy increased by 9.4 years to 60 years, driven mainly by improvements in child survival, progress in malaria control and expanded access to antiretrovirals for treatment of HIV.

“The world has made great strides in reducing the needless suffering and premature deaths that arise from preventable and treatable diseases,” said Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General of WHO. “But the gains have been uneven. Supporting countries to move towards universal health coverage based on strong primary care is the best thing we can do to make sure no-one is left behind.”

Global life expectancy for children born in 2015 was 71.4 years (73.8 years for females and 69.1 years for males), but an individual child’s outlook depends on where he or she is born.

The report shows that newborns in 29 countries – all of them high-income - have an average life expectancy of 80 years or more, while newborns in 22 others – all of them in sub-Saharan Africa - have life expectancy of less than 60 years.

With an average lifespan of 86.8 years, women in Japan can expect to live the longest. Switzerland enjoys the longest average survival for men, at 81.3 years. People in Sierra Leone have the world’s lowest life-expectancy for both sexes: 50.8 years for women and 49.3 years for men.

Healthy life expectancy, a measure of the number of years of good health that a newborn in 2015 can expect, stands at 63.1 years globally (64.6 years for females and 61.5 years for males).

This year’s World Health Statistics brings together the most recent data on the health-related targets within the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in September 2015.

The report highlights significant data gaps that will need to be filled in order to reliably track progress towards the health-related SDGs. For example, an estimated 53% of deaths globally aren’t registered, although several countries – including Brazil, China, the Islamic Republic of Iran, South Africa and Turkey – have made considerable progress in that area.


What to read next

U.S. life expectancy lags behind other wealthy nations
Many older Americans may get unneeded breast, prostate cancer screenings
International research shows the link between public policy and life expectancy