POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES IN LAST 24 HOURS (4.20.2021, 10:36am CEST, WHO):   U.S. 38,084    India 259,170    Brazil 42,980    France 29,344    Russia 8,589    The United Kingdom 1,882    Turkey 55,802    Italy 12,688    Poland 7,302    Argentina 16,267    Columbia 16,871    Iran 24,346    Ukraine 6,506    Peru 7,131    Indonesia 4,952    Czechia 2,364    South Africa 1,089    The Netherlands 8,600    Chile 6,622    Canada 7,591    Romania 2,265    Iraq 7,775    Philippines 9,628    Pakistan 5,152    Hungary 2,680    Bangladesh 4,271    Jordan 3,509    Serbia 2,069    Austria 2,159    Japan 3,265    United Arab Emirates 1,803    Malaysia 2,078    Belarus 1,300    Greece 1,829    Azerbaijan 2,144    Tunisia 1,571    Nepal 1,227    Kuwait 1,510    Paraguay 1,801    Ethiopia 1,792    Venezuela 1,287    Oman 1,399    Bahrain 1,008    Uruguay 2,344    Puerto Rico 1,348    Cuba 1,060    Thailand 1,443    China 25    Singapore 20    New Zealand 1    Australia 24    South Korea 549   

Lyme bacteria survive 28-day course of antibiotics months after infection

Staff Writer |
Bay Area Lyme Foundation announced results of two papers published in the peer-reviewed journals PLOS ONE and American Journal of Pathology.

Article continues below






They seem to support claims of lingering symptoms reported by many patients who have already received antibiotic treatment for the disease.

Based on a single, extensive study of Lyme disease designed by Tulane University researchers, the study employed multiple methods to evaluate the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes, the bacteria that cause Lyme disease, before and after antibiotic treatment in primates.

The study also measured the antibody immune response to the bacteria both pre- and post- treatment, as this is how current diagnostics typically evaluate Lyme disease in humans.

The data show that living B. burgdorferi spirochetes were found in ticks that fed upon the primates and in multiple organs after treatment with 28 days of oral doxycycline.

The results also indicated that the immune response to the bacteria varied widely in both treated and untreated subjects.

"It is apparent from these data that B. burgdorferi bacteria, which have had time to adapt to their host, have the ability to escape immune recognition,tolerate the antibiotic doxycycline and invade vital organs such as the brain and heart," said lead author Monica Embers, PhD, assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at Tulane University School of Medicine.

"In this study, we were able to observe the existence of microscopic disease and low numbers of bacteria, which would be difficult to 'see' in humans but could possibly be the cause of the variable and nonspecific symptoms that are characteristic of post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.

"Although current antibiotic regimens may cure most patients who are treated early, if the infection is allowed to progress, the 28-day treatment may be insufficient, based on these findings," Embers said.

The findings also demonstrated:

- All subjects treated with antibiotics were found to have some level of infection 7 - 12 months post treatment.

- Despite testing negative by antibody tests for Lyme disease, two of 10 subjects were still infected with Lyme bacteria in heart and bladder.

- Lyme bacteria which persist are still viable.


What to read next

Lyme-causing ticks expand their territory in U.S.
Bacteria 'sleep' to survive antibiotic treatments and then attack
Scientists debunk '5-second food-to-floor' rule