POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES IN LAST 24 HOURS (9.24.2021, 6:35pm CEST, WHO):   U.S. 121,396    India 31,382    Brazil 36,473    United Kingdom 35,764    Russia 21,379    Turkey 27,844    France 5,433    Argentina 2,034    Columbia 1,581    Spain 1,056    Italy 4,053    Indonesia 2,557    Germany 9,727    Mexico 11,603    South Africa 2,783    Philippines 17,411    Ukraine 9,058    Malaysia 13,754    Netherlands 1,841    Iraq 2,953    Japan 3,457    Canada 3,870    Bangladesh 1,233    Thailand 12,697    Israel 6,314    Pakistan 2,357    Romania 7,116    Serbia 6,480    Cuba 6,935    Nepal 1,103    Vietnam 9,472    Austria 1,708    Greece 2,101    Georgia 1,698    Belarus 1,973    Costa Rica 2,547    Bulgaria 1,835    Azerbaijan 1,178    Myanmar 1,667    Croatia 1,291    Ireland 1,354    Venezuela 1,140    Ethiopia 1,544    Libya 1,006    Lithuania 1,477    South Korea 2,434    Mongolia 2,612    Slovenia 1,011    Moldova 1,215    Botswana 2,639    New Caledonia 1,078    China 65    Singapore 1,504    New Zealand 10    Australia 1,850   

No definitive link between sunbed use and malignant melanoma

Staff Writer |
The authors refute arguments recently presented in a number of publications, including two reports from the EU and the World Health Organization (WHO).

Article continues below




The results of the studies conducted by Reichrath et al. have recently been published in two articles in the scientific journal Anticancer Research (Vol. 38).

Can artificial UV radiation cause malignant melanoma in humans? In light of the observed increase in skin cancer rates, this question is one that has been and continues to be addressed in numerous studies.

An international team of researchers, coordinated by the Homburg dermatologist Jörg Reichrath, has conducted a thorough search of the scientific databases MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science for relevant studies and subjected the results to a systematic meta-analysis.

Although the team found an association of a slightly increased melanoma risk when comparing 'ever' versus 'never' sunbed users, they identified significant shortcomings in the scientific studies they included in their meta-analysis.

Many of the earlier published results were based on observational studies with poor quality data that fail to support causation.

"When you assess subgroups of study participants, it becomes apparent that other factors may well be playing a role," explains Professor Reichrath.

"For example, solarium use could well be a marker for 'sun worshippers' who, by exposing themselves to excessive levels of natural solar radiation when sunbathing, tend to get sunburnt more often and therefore have a higher melanoma risk."

In their second publication, the authors provide a critical appraisal of two reports recently published by the EU and the WHO. These reports conclude that the UV radiation in solariums is responsible for a noticeable proportion of both non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous-cell carcinoma) and melanoma skin cancer.

Furthermore, these reports state that a large percentage of melanomas found in patients under thirty is due to sunbed exposure.

According to these reports, there is no safe limit for exposure to UV radiation from sunbeds. Professor Jörg Reichrath and his colleagues see things quite differently: "The opinions of the two committees behind these reports are based on an assessment of the existing scientific literature that is incomplete, unbalanced and uncritical".

The conclusions from these reports are not sufficiently supported by the data. Professor Reichrath is very clear on this matter: "The current state of scientific knowledge in the field does not allow one to conclude that moderate solarium use results in an increased risk of malignant melanoma."


What to read next

Scientists pinpoint surprising origin of melanoma
White wine increases chance for melanoma, beer doesn't
Things to know about moles