POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES (11.19.2021, 4:50pm CEST, WHO):   India 11,106    Brazil 11,977    United Kingdom 46,858    Russia 37,156    Turkey 22,234    France 19,840    Argentina 1,553    Germany 52,970    Spain 3,932    Columbia 2,257    Italy 10,645    Mexico 3,836    Ukraine 20,050    Poland 23,242    Philippines 1,297    Malaysia 6,380    Netherlands 23,680    Peru 1,370    Thailand 6,855    Czechia 13,374    Canada 2,448    Romania 3,076    Chile 2,611    Serbia 3,219    Sweden 1,210    Portugal 2,398    Vietnam 10,223    Kazakhstan 1,272    Austria 14,212    Hungary 11,289    Greece 7,276    Georgia 4,278    Bulgaria 2,785    Belarus 1,844    Slovakia 7,418    Azerbaijan 2,124    Croatia 7,270    Bolivia 1,119    Ireland 4,646    Lithuania 1,847    Denmark 4,013    South Korea 3,034    Slovenia 3,662    Latvia 1,221    Laos 1,401    China 31    New Zealand 200    Australia 1,302   

Second cancers deadlier for younger people

Staff Writer |
When a second cancer strikes, it tends to be far more deadly in the young, a new study reveals.

Article continues below




The findings may help explain the poor outcomes of younger cancer patients overall, the researchers added.

The researchers also found that survival odds for nearly all types of cancer are better for an initial cancer than for a second, unrelated cancer. That difference is greatest among patients younger than 40, the study authors said.

"Although the increased incidence of second cancers is well known among cancer survivors, less is known about outcomes of these cancers or the influence of age," said study author Theresa Keegan.

Keegan is a cancer epidemiologist at the University of California, Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The researchers analyzed 1992-2008 data on more than 1 million cancer patients of all ages in the United States. They then looked for second cancers, meaning a new cancer, not a recurrence.

They found that the five-year survival rate for children and young adults was 80 percent after a first cancer. However, it dropped to 47 percent for children and 60 percent for young adults in cases of second cancers, Keegan and her colleagues said in a university news release.

Meanwhile, survival rates in older adults were 70 percent and 61 percent, respectively.

When the researchers focused on the 14 most common cancer types that affect young adults, they found that for all but two, there were significant survival differences depending on whether it was a first or second cancer.

For example, the five-year survival rate for young adults with acute myeloid leukemia was 57 percent if it was a first cancer, but only 29 percent if it was a second cancer.

The five-year survival rate for young adult women with breast cancer was 81 percent if it was a first cancer but only 63 percent if it was a second cancer.

It's not clear why younger patients tend to do worse than older patients with the same second cancers.


What to read next

'Old' lungs may be good transplant options
New imaging tools that trace key breast cancer enzymes may help guide therapies
New compound shows promise in treating multiple human cancers