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NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES IN LAST 24 HOURS (6.18.2021, 11:43am CEST, WHO):   U.S. 11,767    India 67,208    Brazil 95,367    France 2,865    Turkey 6,221    Russia 14,057    The United Kingdom 8,808    Italy 1,400    Argentina 25,878    Columbia 27,827    Spain 1,922    Germany 1,330    Iran 10,291    Mexico 3,789    Ukraine 1,188    Peru 7,713    Indonesia 12,624    South Africa 13,246    The Netherlands 1,040    Chile 6,670    Canada 1,053    Philippines 6,637    Iraq 5,189    Pakistan 1,119    Portugal 1,350    Bangladesh 3,840    Japan 1,560    Malaysia 5,738    Nepal 1,768    United Arab Emirates 2,167    Saudi Arabia 1,309    Ecuador 1,161    Bolivia 2,836    Paraguay 2,612    Panama 1,048    Tunisia 2,379    Costa Rica 1,845    Uruguay 2,900    Kuwait 1,646    Guatemala 1,725    Venezuela 1,341    Oman 2,015    Sri Lanka 2,372    Thailand 3,129    Cuba 1,418    Zambia 3,026    Afghanistan 2,203    Mongolia 2,642    Uganda 1,110    China 198    Singapore 27    New Zealand 1    Australia 11    South Korea 507   

UK coronavirus antibody test found to be success

Christian Fernsby |
Following successful trials, the British government is set to start distributing millions of free coronavirus antibody tests, local media reported on Saturday.

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The finger-prick tests can tell within 20 minutes if a person has been exposed to the virus and were found to be 98.6% accurate during human trials that took place in June.

The test was developed under a partnership between Oxford University and leading diagnostics firms of the UK.

Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at Oxford University and head of the government’s antibody testing program, was quoted by The Telegraph as saying: “This rapid test appears to be truly amazing, and it shows we can do this ourselves.”

Meanwhile, clinical trials to test a new coronavirus vaccine developed by Imperial College London are progressing to their next phase, the university announced.

After a successful initial round of testing on 15 volunteers, 105 more participants will be given the vaccine. The first 15 volunteers will return to receive a second dose as well.

“We have had a promising start but it remains too early to speculate whether our vaccine candidate will be effective in preventing infection,” said Dr Katrina Pollock, clinical lead on the study.

“The early clinical trials are progressing well and I would like to thank all those who are supporting this work, particularly our trial volunteers.”

Professor Robin Shattock, who is leading the development of the vaccine, said: “The progression to the next phase of the trial is an important step in assessing the safety of our vaccine. Analyzing blood samples for antibodies and T-cell response will provide some indication of whether our vaccine can produce an immune response to fight the virus.”


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