POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES IN LAST 24h (2.28.2021, 10:30am CET, WHO):   U.S. 72,812    India 16,752    Brazil 65,169    Russia 11,534    The United Kingdom 8,523    France 24,537    Italy 20,488    Turkey 9,205    Germany 9,762    Columbia 3,567    Argentina 5,469    Mexico 7,512    Poland 12,097    Iran 7,975    South Africa 1,654    Ukraine 8,172    Indonesia 6,208    Peru 7,641    Czechia 14,815    The Netherlands 5,151    Canada 3,255    Chile 4,589    Portugal 1,027    Romania 3,761    Iraq 3,543    Sweden 4,811    Pakistan 1,315    Philippines 2,920    Serbia 3,339    Austria 2,060    Japan 1,201    Hungary 4,948    United Arab Emirates 3,434    Jordan 2,584    Lebanon 3,100    Slovakia 2,848    Malaysia 2,364    Belarus 1,602    Ecuador 1,430    Bolivia 1,069    Bulgaria 1,681    Palestine 1,623    Greece 1,732    Moldova 1,452    Paraguay 1,414    Estonia 1,569    China 42    Singapore 12    New Zealand 0    Australia 7    South Korea 356   

White U.S. kids more likely to get unneeded antibiotics

Staff Writer |
White children are about twice as likely as black or Hispanic kids to get unneeded antibiotics when treated in U.S. emergency rooms for viral respiratory infections, a new study finds.

Article continues below






For years, scientists have warned that unnecessary use of antibiotics is making germs stronger and more resistant to medications.

"It is encouraging that just 2.6 percent of children treated in pediatric emergency departments across the nation received antibiotics for viral acute respiratory tract infections, since antibiotics are ineffective in treating viral infections," said study leader Dr. Monika Goyal.

"However, it is troubling to see such persistent racial and ethnic differences in how medications are prescribed," said Goyal. She is the director of research in the division of emergency medicine at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C.

Upper respiratory infections, which include the common cold, are one of the most common reasons a child visits the emergency department. Research has previously suggested that up to 75 percent of kids with viral respiratory infections are prescribed unnecessary antibiotics.

For the new study, researchers examined medical records from 2013 for more than 39,000 cases of respiratory viral infection treated at seven U.S. pediatric emergency departments. Patients' average age was 3.

Over 4 percent of white patients received antibiotics, versus just under 2 percent of black patients and 3 percent of Hispanic patients, the study found.


What to read next

Kids can beat 'complex' pneumonia without IV antibiotics
Resistant infections rising, longer hospital stays for U.S. children
ADHD diagnoses rising among U.S. kids