POST Online Media Lite Edition



 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES IN LAST 24 HOURS (5.6.2021, 11:21am CEST, WHO):   U.S. 44,834    India 412,262    Brazil 77,359    France 23,116    Turkey 28,997    Russia 7,975    The United Kingdom 1,946    Italy 9,113    Spain 2,431    Germany 18,034    Argentina 26,238    Columbia 14,551    Poland 3,899    Iran 15,872    Mexico 3,064    Ukraine 2,546    Peru 4,562    Indonesia 5,285    Czechia 2,412    South Africa 1,187    The Netherlands 7,830    Canada 6,708    Chile 3,885    Iraq 5,813    Philippines 5,685    Sweden 3,058    Pakistan 4,113    Hungary 1,130    Bangladesh 1,742    Jordan 1,220    Serbia 1,304    Austria 1,297    Japan 3,763    Lebanon 1,012    United Arab Emirates 1,954    Malaysia 3,744    Saudi Arabia 1,016    Ecuador 1,806    Nepal 8,605    Greece 1,368    Croatia 2,494    Azerbaijan 1,381    Georgia 2,171    Tunisia 1,448    Bolivia 1,588    Paraguay 2,214    Kuwait 1,451    Costa Rica 1,304    Lithuania 1,249    Egypt 1,102    Guatemala 1,194    Honduras 1,358    Uruguay 2,826    Bahrain 1,450    Sri Lanka 1,939    Cuba 1,010    Thailand 1,911    Mongolia 1,128    Réunion 1,070    China 18    Singapore 16    New Zealand 4    Australia 13    South Korea 574   

White U.S. kids more likely to get unneeded antibiotics

Staff Writer |
White children are about twice as likely as black or Hispanic kids to get unneeded antibiotics when treated in U.S. emergency rooms for viral respiratory infections, a new study finds.

Article continues below






For years, scientists have warned that unnecessary use of antibiotics is making germs stronger and more resistant to medications.

"It is encouraging that just 2.6 percent of children treated in pediatric emergency departments across the nation received antibiotics for viral acute respiratory tract infections, since antibiotics are ineffective in treating viral infections," said study leader Dr. Monika Goyal.

"However, it is troubling to see such persistent racial and ethnic differences in how medications are prescribed," said Goyal. She is the director of research in the division of emergency medicine at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C.

Upper respiratory infections, which include the common cold, are one of the most common reasons a child visits the emergency department. Research has previously suggested that up to 75 percent of kids with viral respiratory infections are prescribed unnecessary antibiotics.

For the new study, researchers examined medical records from 2013 for more than 39,000 cases of respiratory viral infection treated at seven U.S. pediatric emergency departments. Patients' average age was 3.

Over 4 percent of white patients received antibiotics, versus just under 2 percent of black patients and 3 percent of Hispanic patients, the study found.


What to read next

Kids can beat 'complex' pneumonia without IV antibiotics
Resistant infections rising, longer hospital stays for U.S. children
ADHD diagnoses rising among U.S. kids