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NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 CASES (latest WHO data):   India 18,327    Brazil 75,102    Russia 11,024    The United Kingdom 6,573    France 24,739    Spain 2,676    Italy 22,845    Turkey 11,322    Germany 10,580    Columbia 3,565    Argentina 11,767    Mexico 7,521    Poland 15,831    Iran 8,367    South Africa 1,404    Ukraine 10,155    Indonesia 6,971    Peru 4,878    Czechia 14,714    The Netherlands 4,161    Canada 2,832    Chile 5,331    Romania 4,271    Iraq 5,127    Sweden 4,864    Philippines 3,037    Pakistan 1,579    Serbia 3,866    Austria 2,691    Hungary 6,369    Japan 1,164    Jordan 4,584    United Arab Emirates 3,072    Lebanon 3,202    Slovakia 2,423    Malaysia 2,154    Belarus 1,174    Ecuador 1,335    Bulgaria 2,198    Palestine 1,826    Greece 2,217    Kuwait 1,613    Slovenia 1,019    Moldova 1,800    Paraguay 1,439    Estonia 1,534    China 21    Singapore 9    New Zealand 9    Australia 18    South Korea 417   

WHO official says pandemic to end at beginning of 2022

Christian Fernsby |
The World Health Organization (WHO) regional director for Europe Hans Kluge said Sunday he believes the coronavirus outbreak will end in early 2022.

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Hans Kluge told Danish state broadcaster DR that COVID-19 will still be prevalent in 2021, but it will be more manageable than in 2020.

Stating that the worst scenarios are now over, Kluge said there is more information concerning the virus compared to 2020, when it first began spreading.

He cautioned, however, that no one can know the future of the COVID-19 pandemic in advance.

“There will continue to be a virus, but I don't think restrictions will be needed. This is an optimistic message," he said.

Kluge said mutations are normal and the virus is trying to adapt to the person infected, but the rapid spread of the mutations are a concern for them.

Adding that the WHO is closely monitoring the effectiveness of vaccines developed against COVID-19 due to the fast-spreading types of the virus, he said vaccines can be altered based on the new mutations if necessary and there is no need to produce them from the ground up.

He said mutations will not make the virus out of control but noted that countries whose health care systems are already under pressure could come under even more pressure, which makes it necessary to take the mutations very seriously.

Kluge indicated that the biggest problem will emerge when those who are vaccinated are in the same environment with those who are not, so scheduling is a very important factor.


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