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Egypt archeologists unearth 110 ancient tombs in Nile Delta

Christian Fernsby |
Egyptian archeologists unearthed 110 burial tombs at an ancient site in a Nile Delta province, the Tourism and Antiquities Ministry said Tuesday.

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The graves, some of which have human remains inside, were found at the Koum el-Khulgan archeological site in Dakahlia province, around 150 kilometers (93 miles) northeast of Cairo, the ministry said.

They include 68 oval-shaped tombs dating back to the Predynastic Period that spanned from 6000-3150 B.C., the ministry said.

There are also 37 rectangular-shaped tombs from an ancient era known as the Second Intermediate Period (1782-1570 B.C.), when the Semitic people of Hyksos ruled ancient Egypt, the ministry added.

The remaining five oval-shaped tombs date back to the Naqada III period that spanned from around 3200 B.C. to 3000 B.C.

Archeologists also found human remains of adults and children and funerary equipment and pottery objects in these tombs, the ministry said.


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